Our People

Stacey Edwards

Associate Professor | Group Leader

Functional Cancer Genomics

+61 7 3845 3029

stacey.edwards@qimrberghofer.edu.au

 

CAREER HISTORY

Associate Professor Stacey Edwards is an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and Head of the Functional Cancer Genomics Laboratory at QIMR Berghofer. She completed her PhD in 2002 at the University of Queensland (UQ). Her postdoctoral training was carried out at the Breast Cancer Now Toby Robins Research Centre in London, funded by an NHMRC CJ Martin Fellowship. She returned to UQ in 2010 and was awarded a National Breast Cancer Foundation Fellowship to identify new mutation targets in breast cancer. She was recruited to QIMR Berghofer in 2013, where she established a multidisciplinary group focused on understanding how genetic variation in the non-coding genome contributes to cancer development.

 

CURRENT APPOINTMENTS

2018-current: Group Leader, Functional Cancer Genomics Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer

2018-current: NHMRC Senior Research Fellow

2018-current: Adjunct Associate Professor, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology

2016-current: Honorary Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland

 

PREVIOUS APPOINTMENTS

2013-2017: Team Head, Functional Cancer Genomics Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer

2010-2012: NBCF Early Career Fellow and Lecturer, University of Queensland

2005-2008: Research Officer, Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Institute

2002-2004: Research Officer, University of Queensland, Australia

 

ORCID NUMBER

0000-0001-7428-4139

 

RESEARCHER ID

A-4980-2011

 

CURRENT AREA OF RESEARCH

Associate Professor Stacey Edward’s research focuses on understanding how genetic variation contributes to cancer risk and progression. Her laboratory is particularly interested in translating the findings of cancer genome-wide association studies (GWAS), particularly breast cancer. This includes identification of functional risk variants, connecting these variants to their target genes and understanding how these genes contribute to cancer development. Identification of the key genes and the pathways responsible for risk will increase our understanding of the biology underpinning cancer aetiology and provide key targets suitable for future drug repositioning or drug development. These outcomes will pave the way for future clinical trials for cancer prevention or treatment.

 

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS

  • using Capture Hi-C chromatin interaction technology we have identified more than 600 candidate breast cancer genes
  • using a targeted RNA sequencing approach we have identified more than 3000 long non-coding RNAs, many of which may be involved in driving breast cancer development
  • identification and evaluation of two novel long-noncoding RNAs that contribute to breast cancer through modulation of DNA repair pathways
  • elucidation of the causal variants, target genes and underlying molecular mechanism at 15 breast, ovarian and endometrial cancer risk regions

 

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

2018-current: American Association for Cancer Research

2011-current: American Society of Human Genetics

2008-current: Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Familial Breast Cancer

2012-2016: Lorne Cancer Conference Organising Committee

 

AWARDS RECOGNITION

2018-2022: NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship

2010-2015: National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) Early Career Fellowship

2009-2012: University of Queensland ResTeach Award

2005-2009: NHMRC CJ Martin Overseas Fellowship

1999-2001: Queensland Cancer Fund PhD Scholarship

1999-2001: John Earnshaw Scholarship (highest ranked PhD candidate)

 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

1998-2002: PhD, University of Queensland

1994-1997: BSc (Honours), Queensland University of Technology